#RPGaDay2017 Day 6: What would you do if you could game for a week?

rpg_a_day_2017

Day 6: You can game every day for a week.
Describe what you’d do.

Well, as a DM, this would be a godsend, presuming, as this is a hypothetical, that I could have all my players in a single room for an entire week of D&D.

First, I would build a massive and elaborate set, using combinations of Dwarven Forge tiles, model railroad terrain, and various other concoctions.

Something like this —

table

Having a solid week to immerse ourselves in the game, I would build layers of political intrigue and Machiavellian scheming that would culminate in an epic castle siege and rollicking battle that would be heralded for ages to come.

What? A guy can dream can’t he?

Tilted

These are the Rules of Jousting, written by King Alfonso XI of Castile and presented to the Order of the Band in 1330.

jousting-1

First Rule

Firstly, we declare that the knights who must joust should run four courses, and no more. And if in these four courses one knight should hit the other, splintering his lance, and the knight upon whom that lance splintered did not break his own lance by striking his opponent, he shall be vanquished, for he did not break his lance.

Second Rule

And furthermore, we declare that, if one knight splinters two lances and the other only one, the winner shall be the knight who breaks the two lances. But if the knight who only splintered one lance knocks off his opponent’s helm with the same blow, a tie shall be declared between him and the knight who splintered the two lances.

Third Rule

And furthermore, if a knight shatters two lances by striking his opponent, and the knight who has been struck knocks him off his horse, even though he did not splinter his lance, a tie shall be declared between him and the knight who splintered the two lanes.

jousting-2

Fourth Rule

Furthermore, if one knight knocks down both his opponent and his horse, and the other knocks down the knight but not his horse, we declare that the knight whose horse fell with him shall be the winner, because the fault in this case was the horse’s and not the rider’s. And in the case of the knight who fell but whose horse did not, the fault rests with the knight and not with the horse.

Fifth Rule

Furthermore, we declare that lance staves shall not be judged properly broken if they are broken crosswise, but only if they break after striking with the point.

Sixth Rule

Furthermore, we declare that if in these four courses each knight splinters two staves, or one each, or they each strike in the same place, a tie will be declared between these two. And if in these four courses they never manage to hit each other at all, let the judgement be that they jousted poorly.

jousting-3

Seventh Rule

Furthermore, we declare that if any knight should drop his lance whilst charging, without ever coming to blows, his opponent should raise his lance and not strike him, for it would be unchivalrous to strike an opponent who had no lance.

Eighth Rule

And in order to judge these affairs, we declare that there should be four judges in place: two assigned to one team, and another two assigned to the other team, so that they can ensure that the knights who have jousted the best are declared the winners.

Nine Crowns

Nine Crowns of Willen

Welcome

Some preliminary world-building on our next campaign world, slated for a January 2017 launch which should coincide with the 4 year anniversary of out reunion game.

It’s a little more Martin than Tolkien at the onset as I’m looking to make things, particularly magical things, have a bit more value, be a bit more wondrous and awe-inducing.

D&D, and Pathfinder, by and large, have been huge, high fantasy, super-hero romps and I think it’s high time for our group to get a little dirty. I want to see more wheeling and dealing. I want consequences for their actions. I want to smell the market and feel the sting of the sword cut…

Here’s to hoping we can pull it off.

Addendum: Someone asked about “the Great Ice Shield”, wondering if it was akin to “The Wall” in George R.R. Martin’s Song of Ice & Fire.

The answer is ‘no’. The Great Ice Shield refers to two things. 1.) the “wall” of cold that grips the north making habitability a dicey proposition; and 2.) the shield wall of the northern barbarians who have carved out an existence in that brutal landscape.

Call the Banners!

Work on a new campaign world for my Oak Hill Dungeons & Dragons Club mates continues. They’re all nearing 20th level after more than two years of play and I have stated my desire to start afresh in a new world, so I’m building it from the ground up.

I figure I have about 5 months to pull it off, so no worries… yet.

I have found myself needing a way to track Houses and their Lands, as this next campaign I intend to run with fewer ‘dungeon crawls’ and more intrigue oriented adventures. From a TV correlation, think ‘more Game of Thrones‘ and less ‘Shannara Chronicles‘.

Anyway, I threw this House Sheet together this morning. There is, admittedly, a healthy influence from some custom Song of Ice & Fire RPG sheets I tracked down on the internet, but I gave it some of my own flavor.

It has everything I think I’ll need for a quick, cursory glance as a DM, but playtesting will tell the tale.

House Sheet